Education

Patient Education



patient guideSurviving cancer begins with early detection and diagnosis, and continues during and after treatment. The Cancer Care Team at the Kennedy Cancer Center is here to provide guidance, information and the assistance you need to have the best possible quality of life, no matter where you are on the cancer journey.

Start here and learn the basic facts about cancer, symptoms, risk factors and treatment options. You will find answers to many of your questions about cancer here. 

Then browse the offerings at our Hope and Healing Center, which offers many healing and educational offerings.
Becoming smoke-free is one of the best things you can do to improve your health. By quitting smoking, you can improve your lung function and circulation and reduce your chance of developing certain cancers and heart disease, among many other benefits. It may help you add years to your life.New Jersey has several support options to help you quit smoking: • NJ Quitline: 1-866-NJ-STOPS or 1-866-657-8677 (TTY: 711). Design a program that fits your needs and get support from counselors. Hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (except holidays) and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The program supports 26 languages. For more information visit: www.njquitline.org. • NJ QuitNet: www.nj.quitnet.com. This is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week online resource with free peer support and trained counselors. The medicines listed below can help you quit smoking. Ask your doctor if any of these are right for you: Varenicline (Chantix) Bupropion (Zyban) Nicotine transdermal patches (Nicoderm) Nicotine intranasal spray (Nicotrol nasal spray) Nicotine inhaler (Nicotrol inhaler) Nicotine polacrilex gum (Nicorette) Nicotine polacrilex lozenge (Committ) If you or someone you know is a smoker, we encourage taking our lung cancer screening quiz to see if a lung cancer screening is appropriate.

 

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Cancer is a group of over 100 diseases that begin in cells, the body's basic unit of life. Normally, cells grow and divide to produce more cells only when the body needs them. However, sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. The genetic material (DNA) of a cell can become damaged or changed, producing mutations that affect normal cell growth and division. When this happens, cells do not die when they should and new cells form when the body does not need them. The extra cells may form a mass of tissue called a tumor. Tumors can be malignant (cancerous) or benign (not cancerous).

 

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The most common type of cancer in the United States is non-melanoma skin cancer, with more than 2,000,000 new cases expected in the United States in 2011.

 

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Cancer that is detected in its earliest stages, when the tumor tends to be smaller and has not spread to other parts of the body, has the greatest likelihood of cure and long terms survival. For this reason, certain screening tests are recommended to detect specific cancers as early as possible.

 

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Your doctor may use one or more approaches to diagnose cancer: Physical exam. Your doctor may feel areas of your body for lumps that may indicate a tumor. During a physical exam he or she may look for any abnormalities, such as changes in skin color or enlargement of an organ, that may indicate cancer.

 

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Medical Oncologist A medical oncologist is a doctor who completes a three-year residency in internal medicine, followed by a two-year fellowship in oncology. A medical oncologist prescribes chemotherapy and works with primary care physicians and other medical specialists. Often, the medical oncologist is the coordinator of the treatment team, keeping track of the various tests results and follow-up exams performed by other specialists.

 

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The most common forms of cancer treatment are surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Sometimes, these treatments are used alone to treat cancer, but more often they are used in combination, either in sequence or at the same time. For example, chemotherapy is used as the only cancer treatment. But more often, you will get chemotherapy along with surgery, radiation therapy, or biological therapy.

 

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Clinical trials are research studies in which people help doctors find ways to improve health and cancer care. Each study tries to answer scientific questions and to find better ways to prevent, diagnose, or treat cancer.

 

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Below are a list of websites sponsored by reliable sources that offer education, support and other services for cancer patients. You are encouraged to visit these sites to obtain additional information and learn more about the valuable services they offer. Brain Tumors · American Brain Tumor Association · National Brain Tumor Foundation Breast Cancer · Breast Cancer Organization · Living Beyond Breast Cancer · Susan G. Komen Foundation · Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization Clinical Trials · Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups Colorectal Cancer · Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation · Colon Cancer Alliance · Colorectal Careline · United Ostomy Association General Cancer Information · American Cancer Society · Cancer Care · Cancer Hope Network · Cancer Survival Toolbox · CURE (Cancer Updates, Research and Education) · Fertile Hope · Lotsa Helping Hands · National Cancer Institute · OncoLink · SHARE · Cancer Support Community Gyn Cancers · Gynecologic Cancer Foundation · National Cervical Cancer Coalition · Ovarian Cancer National Alliance · Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Kidney Cancer · Kidney Cancer Association Leukemia & Lymphoma · Leukemia & Lymphoma Society · Lymphoma Foundation of America · Lymphoma Research Foundation Lung Cancer · Lung Cancer Alliance · Lung Cancer Online · Mesothelioma Center · Mesothelioma Help Myeloma · International Myeloma Foundation · Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation Pain · American Chronic Pain Association · American Pain Association Pancreatic Cancer · Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCan) Sarcoma · Northwest Sarcoma Foundation · Sarcoma Foundation of America Skin Cancer · Melanoma Research Foundation Survivorship · Lance Armstrong Foundation · National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship · People Living with Cancer Thyroid Cancer · Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Association Young Adults I'm Too Young for This

 

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Key Patient Contacts

Louise M. Baca RN MSN - Cancer Center Administrator
856-218-5321

Oncology Nurse Navigator
Appointment scheduling and treatment navigation.
856-218-5324

Abigale Hassel, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C - Social Worker
Patient support and information.
856-218-5322

Cancer Center Accreditations

Commission on Cancer, ACR, NAPBC, Screening Center of Excellence

Upcoming Classes

Tai Chi - 05/02/2016
Tai Chi is a Chinese slow motion exercise designed to promote good health and longevity by circulating internal energy or 'chi.' Benefits include promoting relaxation and reducing stress. Anyone can do it regardless of age or condition. Great by itself or complements other exercises, lowers blood pressure, improves balance and coordination, slows and improves breathing and builds strength and vitality for cancer patients during and after treatment.

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HOPE - Helping Oncology Patients Exercise - 05/02/2016
Open to adult cancer patients of all ages and fitness levels. Research suggests exercise can help cancer patients reduce pain, nausea, anxiety and fatigue, improve ability to perform daily activities and enhance mood.

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